Cricket is a new kind of wearable with multiple onboard sensors.


Cricket measures high quality real-time data from:
Muscles (sEMG),
Heart (EKG),
Brain (EEG),
Posture (Gyr),
Respiration (Acc) and
Movement (Acc).

Somaxis has been recognized as a 2017 TransTech 200 Innovator for contributing to mental health, emotional wellbeing and human thriving! http://transtech200.com/

Somaxis is proud to announce that in 2017 it has been selected for the NVIDIA AI Inception Program. Through this partnership, Somaxis gains access to cutting edge technology and industry experts as AI is combined with wearable sensor technology to enable the creation of next generation of health tech solutions.


How it works:

  • Cricket is worn on the body. It communicates with Chirp (iOS app) using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE).
  • Completely wireless data collection.
  • Chirp views real-time data, records data, and generates reports.
  • Chirp exports raw and filtered data to your Mac or PC.
  • Can be used embedded into textiles for gyroscope and/or accelerometer data.
  • Can be used with comfortable hypoallergenic Patches for sEMG, EKG, and EEG data collection.

  • Award-winning, patented design:

    • Sensor “floats” above skin during movement, absorbing shock and minimizing “skin stretch” noise.
    • A single Cricket can be used in different locations on the body to measure muscles, the heart, brain, etc.
    • A single Cricket can measure one EXG channel plus accelerometer (x,y,z) and gyroscope (p,r,y) data simultaneously = 7 data streams.
    • Automatic report generation for ergonomics, physical therapy, and biofeedback
    • Full access to raw and filtered data in .csv format via Mac or PC
    • Tailored iOS apps for research, ergonomics, physical therapy, occupational therapy, biofeedback, sports science, physical rehabilitation, and corporate wellness.
    • Feedback: visual, audio, and haptics (on-sensor vibration)
    • Up to four Crickets may be used per iOS device, and multiple iOS devices can record simultaneously for unlimited channel count.


    A technological leap forward with this patented design: Cricket “floats” above skin during movement, absorbing shock and minimizing skin stretch noise.

    Cricket Floats
    Cricket Floating Traps
    Cricket Floating Lumbar

    “I’m an office administrator for an advertising agency. The job requires me to multitask. My body incurred severe aches and pains through work. I had so much neck pain and back pain. I did not know what to expect when my physical therapist started retraining my muscles using Crickets. I quickly learned how to correct my behavior to achieve relaxation / minimize muscle tension. This has enhanced my quality of life tremendously.” -Jean W.

    Crickets are in use at Fortune 500 companies and other organizations around the USA and internationally


    “Sensor based training with the Somaxis Cricket was the single biggest factor in my recovery from a repetitive strain injury. It created a real-time feedback loop to address the root cause head on. The Cricket also helps me work comfortably knowing that I will not re-injure myself.” -Kelsey S.

    “I’m an executive assistant. Even though I’m only 31, I noticed that I have already started developing back pain and pain in my jaw from clenching my muscles. I got training from a specialist using Somaxis muscle sensors, and after only a few training sessions I found that my back pain, jaw pain, and muscle tension decreased significantly, both at work and at home. I am really grateful for this training.” -Vanessa N.

    Crickets can be found in use at:













    “I am now making a conscious effort to drop my hand to the side while mousing. I feel armed with the information that was shared with me about the tension points in my body, and I am now more sensitive to proper posture.” -Melissa L.






    Cricket is not certified for use as a lifesaving medical device. It should not be used to diagnose or treat medical conditions. It should not be used in place of medical advice. If you have any health concerns, speak with your primary care physician.